John Kerschbaum's Tumblr Artblog

comicbookalex:

I was giving a brief talk in a comics class and came up with this page to basically give a summary of how I work. This is more or less the way I’ve worked for my entire comics career (I did A Kidnapped Santa Claus differently but we won’t go into that now). 
Panel 1: In my sketchbook I’ll work out all the dialogue and key expressions. Once I have about a page-worth I’ll sketch out a rough layout. 
Panel 2: I’ll take out a piece of Borden & Riley bristol plate paper (I used to work as large as 10 x 15” when I was doing Box Office Poison but I currently draw at a tiny 6.5 x 11”. I thought this would mean I’d finish pages quicker but, well, we know how that worked out). 
I’ll use a T-square to rule out the panel borders and roughly pencil in the figures and background elements. 
Panel 3: Yes, this is where I put the lettering in. I don’t rule out guidelines or even pencil my lettering. I’m a maverick! Sometimes I’ll make changes to the dialogue at this point, though, as I said, it can be risky. I’ll change a word or two, forgetting that it might have an impact on later dialogue. 
Panel 4: Pretty self-explanatory. I use my T-square to rule out the panel borders (unless there’s a specific reason not to). 
Panel 5: Starting to ink, what I consider the real “drawing” part of the process. Many times my pencils are as loose as the examples above, though I’ll sometimes do tighter pencils if I’m trying to do an especially tricky or unusual thing. I like to leave as much room for spontaneity as possible. 
As stated, I usually start inking the smallest (or otherwise easiest) panel first, since it’s a good way to get the momentum going. I usually complete one panel at time (as opposed to some people who will do all the figures first and do background later, for instance).
Background are what I call a necessary evil. 
Panel 6: (Mostly) Done! After I erase the pencils I fill in the blacks with brushes and Windsor Newton India Ink. I’ll also back and fill in details or other things I only noticed after the pencils were gone. I used to erase the pencils after I filled in the blacks but I noticed it tended to lighten the black ink. Back during Box Office Poison I used to use Sharpies to fill in the blacks but they age very badly, turning a sickly brown/green color (it’s the reason I stopped selling BOP pages—I haven’t looked at them in years and I’m a little scared to do so). Lesson: if you plan on selling your originals, use good materials. 
Any questions? 

comicbookalex:

I was giving a brief talk in a comics class and came up with this page to basically give a summary of how I work. This is more or less the way I’ve worked for my entire comics career (I did A Kidnapped Santa Claus differently but we won’t go into that now). 

Panel 1: In my sketchbook I’ll work out all the dialogue and key expressions. Once I have about a page-worth I’ll sketch out a rough layout. 

Panel 2: I’ll take out a piece of Borden & Riley bristol plate paper (I used to work as large as 10 x 15” when I was doing Box Office Poison but I currently draw at a tiny 6.5 x 11”. I thought this would mean I’d finish pages quicker but, well, we know how that worked out). 

I’ll use a T-square to rule out the panel borders and roughly pencil in the figures and background elements. 

Panel 3: Yes, this is where I put the lettering in. I don’t rule out guidelines or even pencil my lettering. I’m a maverick! Sometimes I’ll make changes to the dialogue at this point, though, as I said, it can be risky. I’ll change a word or two, forgetting that it might have an impact on later dialogue. 

Panel 4: Pretty self-explanatory. I use my T-square to rule out the panel borders (unless there’s a specific reason not to). 

Panel 5: Starting to ink, what I consider the real “drawing” part of the process. Many times my pencils are as loose as the examples above, though I’ll sometimes do tighter pencils if I’m trying to do an especially tricky or unusual thing. I like to leave as much room for spontaneity as possible. 

As stated, I usually start inking the smallest (or otherwise easiest) panel first, since it’s a good way to get the momentum going. I usually complete one panel at time (as opposed to some people who will do all the figures first and do background later, for instance).

Background are what I call a necessary evil. 

Panel 6: (Mostly) Done! After I erase the pencils I fill in the blacks with brushes and Windsor Newton India Ink. I’ll also back and fill in details or other things I only noticed after the pencils were gone. I used to erase the pencils after I filled in the blacks but I noticed it tended to lighten the black ink. Back during Box Office Poison I used to use Sharpies to fill in the blacks but they age very badly, turning a sickly brown/green color (it’s the reason I stopped selling BOP pages—I haven’t looked at them in years and I’m a little scared to do so). Lesson: if you plan on selling your originals, use good materials. 

Any questions

# tbt While I was still in college I was lucky enough to work for The Associated Press. I drew a daily feature about weather trivia as well as various spot illustrations. This one, about overweight umpires, ended up on a CNN sports report. In case you can’t tell from the George Bell/Dave Winfield trade talk or the anchor’s hair and tie, this aired in 1988!

Some Old Comics For Looking At

Here’s a slew of a comic strips I did back in 1996 or so.image

Reminder!

Birdcage Bottom Books will be debuting this embarrassing little tome at SPX this weekend. You’ll be smacking your forehead later if you blow your chance to own one.

MAD # 529

Hey, I’ve got some pretty pictures in this here magazine! It’s been on newsstands for weeks. Whatcha waiting for?

You can get the details over at Tom Richmond’s MADblog! http://www.tomrichmond.com/blog/2014/08/11/on-the-stands-mad-529/

mikedawwwson:

Angie Bongiolatti updates.

I’ve improved the Angie Bongiolatti page on my website. I’ve composed a new book description, and added a link to the meaty preview pdf that Secret Acres put together.

Reminder that I am selling copies of the book through PayPal. For cover price ($20), I will sign and sketch in your copy, will include shipping, and will throw in an additional mini comic while supplies last.

Reach me at mikedawsoncomics (at) hotmail (dot) com

A Space Odyssey in Queens

Not that you should need more reason than this http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/7-subway-line-rated-best-city-article-1.1885375 to come visit Queens. But there’s a neat exhibit on view in my neighborhood. Epicures, artists and space nerds should take special note: There is a scale model of the solar system that “begins” in the NYC panorama at the Queens Museum of Art with a model of the sun. The planets, all in scale then stretch past through the museum, then out, past the Queens Zoo toward the Hall of Science (where you’ll find Saturn in the lobby) and then continues outward into the neighborhood of Corona. The planets are located at some of the best eating spots around. Nixtamal houses Neptune and serves great Mexican food and serves imported coca cola (the kind with real sugar in it instead of corn syrup). And Pluto is in Leo’s Latticini, better know as “Mama’s.” It has some incredible Italian food (heroes, subs, sandwiches, cheeses, pasta, etc.). I’ve never been to Cucino A Modo Mio. And since you’re in the vicinity, walk the extra block into deep space and get yourself an icy at The World’s Famous Lemon Ice King of Corona. (I marked it with a star on the map.) It’s not part of the exhibit but serves out-of-this-world ices. I couldn’t find a map online like the one I’ve posted here. (I picked this one up at the HoS.) But here is a link with some more info about the rest of the exhibit. Enjoy!

birdcagebottombooks:

Guess what? It’s time to pre-order your copy of “Cringe: an anthology of embarrassment” and get great rewards through our Kickstarter campaign!

CRINGE collects over twenty stories of personal humiliation, shame & awkwardness from a variety of indie cartoonists.  

Contributors include Cara Bean, Box Brown, Jeffrey Brown, Chris Carlier, Peter Conrad, Chad Essley, Andrew Farago, Shaenon Garrity, Delaine Derry Green, Sam Henderson, Victor Kerlow, Steve Lafler, Lizz Lunney, Fred Noland, Stephen Notley, Adam Pasion, Sam Spina, Geoff Vasile, Jamie Vayda & Alan King, Chad Woody, Jess Worby & J.T. Yost. 

Front cover by John Kerschbaum, back cover by Danny Hellman, title page by Gabby Schulz and spot illustration by Noah Van Sciver

Edited by Peter S. Conrad

(via yeaboiiiii)

25 Years Ago Today!

Actually, I wrote this comic in 1991 but the “action” is set on this day in 1989. And it’s all true. Enjoy!

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Mystery Sketch of the Night

I woke up this morning to find this doodling of Slim Goodbody in my sketchbook. I have no recollection of drawing it. Or why.image

Not Exactly The HIghlight of My Career

I was recently reminded of a job I sorta bungled a year or so ago. I’ll spare you all the gory details (contract problems) but here’s the result, a find-the-hidden-pictures puzzle loosely based on the Hall of Dinosaurs at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History that won’t see print. So, just for fun, can you find the tweezers, scissors, eyeglasses, teacup, pliers, spool of thread, plunger, comb, spatula, feather, slice of pie, cupcake, football, hockey stick, band-aid, apple core, ant, wishbone, crown, ice cream pop, party hat, leaf, golf club, chopsticks and a ruler?

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mikedawwwson:

The Age of Play - Part One

A brand new serialized comic story launches today at Study Group Comic Books. I’ll be updating this weekly.

(Source: mikedawwwson, via inkpanthers)

Rejected Sketch O’ The Day

Here’s a (totally understandably) rejected sketch from this past week.

An Untitled Story About an Apple Tree

Another old tree-themed comic in honor of yesterday being Arbor Day, my favorite holiday of the year. This one is from the 2001 SPX anthology.

Timberdoodle

In honor of yesterday being Arbor Day (a holiday near and dear to us Kerschbaums) here for your reading pleasure is my 1999 Ignatz-nominated mini comic Timberdoodle. It has to do with wood. Probably NSFW. 

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